BIBLE STUDY

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Introduction

Observation: Paragraph Titles, Charting, Background, Style, Structure, Integration of Style & Structure, Conjunctions, Structural Laws, Analytical Diagram & Observation Chart, Word Studies, Figures of Speech, Parallelisms

Interpretation: History, Interpretative Phrases

Application


CONJUNCTIONS

As explained earlier, structure within paragraphs makes use of conjunctions. For a more comprehensive treatment of conjunctions, see Robert A. Traina, Methodical Bible Study, pages 41-43.

The definition of a conjunction, for the purpose of Bible study, is a word used with a clause or sentence to show its relation to some other clause or sentence. Like a sentence, a clause has a subject and a predicate but a sentence may utilize several clauses. A subject may be implied, but not the verb.

A conjunction is not a preposition. A preposition describes the relationship only between nouns or pronouns and another word or other words in the sentence.

A conjunction, as defined here, must do more than just connect words or phrases. It must connect clauses and sentences. See the following table for examples:

Identifying Bible Study Conjunctions

Definition of a Conjunction

The table below is a catalog of conjunctions giving the type of connection each makes and an appropriate illustration. Remember the New American Standard version is being used unless otherwise noted.

Note that some conjunctions are used in more than one way.

This is not an exhaustive listing of conjunctions. But after understanding the definition of a conjunction, after dealing with the examples that follow and while consulting an English dictionary; you should be able to identify other conjunctions as you observe them in Scripture.

BIBLE STUDY CONJUNCTIONS

Conjunction

Connection

Illustration

and

series of facts

Romans 2:17-19

as

comparison

Romans 9:24-25

temporal

Acts 16:16

as . . . but

contrast

Matthew 3:11

as . . . even so

comparison

Romans 5:18

because

reason

Romans 1:18-19

before

temporal

John 8:58

both . . . and

series of facts

John 7:28

but

contrast

Romans 4:20

Matthew 11:7-8

consequently

result

Matthew 19:5-6

either . . . or

contrast

Matthew 6:24

even though

concessive

Daniel 5:22

for

reason

Matthew 3:1-3

however

contrast

Galatians 3:11-12

if

condition

Romans 2:25

in order that

purpose

Matthew 5:25

in order to

purpose

Matthew 6:5

in such a way that

purpose

Matthew 5:16

in that

explanatory

Romans 5:8

just as

comparison

Romans 4:5-6

lest

negative purpose

Matthew 4:6

neither . . . nor

negative series of facts

Acts 2:31

nevertheless

contrast

Romans 5:13-14

nor

negative series of facts

Matthew 5:14-15

now

series of facts

Matthew 3:4

inference

Romans 6:7-8

or

series of alternatives

Matthew 26:51-53

series of facts

2 Corinthians 6:14-16

or else

series of alternatives

1 Corinthians 7:11

otherwise

reason

Matthew 6:1

since

reason

Genesis 46:30

so

comparison

Matthew 7:12

inference

Matthew 1:17 (KJV)

result

2 Kings 13:3

so that

purpose

Matthew 6:17-18

result

Daniel 5:20

so then

inference

Matthew 7:19-20

that

purpose

Ephesians 5:25-27

indirect discourse

Acts 20:26

then

inference

Galatians 2:21

temporal

Matthew 2:16

therefore

inference

1 Corinthians 10:11-12

though

concessive

Job 13:15

reflection

Romans 5:17

thus

comparison

1 Peter 3:6

until

temporal

Matthew 2:13

when

temporal

John 11:31

while

temporal

Romans 5:8

yet

contrast

Mark 14:29

 

CONNECTION DEFINITIONS

Connection

Definition

Illustration

Comparison

The conjunction promotes the examination of points of resemblance between the clauses or sentences.

"as" in Romans 9:24-25

Concession

The conjunction introduces a clause or sentence that grants a usually adverse condition under which the action in another clause or sentence will still take place.

"though" in Job 13:15

Condition

The conjunction introduces a clause or sentence that describes a performance that must be met before the action in another clause or sentence can take place.

"if" in Romans 2:25

Contrast

The conjunction promotes the examination of points of difference between the clauses or sentences.

"as . . . but" in Matthew 3:11

Explanatory

Two clauses and/or sentences are connected in such a way that the second explains the first.

"in that" in Romans 5:8

Indirect Discourse

The conjunction provides a clause or sentence that contains a description of a quotation (nor the exact quotation).

"that" in Acts 20:26

Inference

The conjunction introduces a clause or sentence that describes a deduction based on another clause or sentence.

"therefore" in 1 Corinthians 10:11-12

Purpose

The conjunction introduces a clause or sentence that describes the goal of the action in another clause or sentence.

"in order that" in Matthew 5:25

Reason

The conjunction introduces a clause or sentence that justifies the action in another clause or sentence.

"for" in Matthew 3:1-3

Reflection

The writer elaborates on a remote possibility mentioned in the connected clause or sentence.

"though" in Romans 5:17

Result

The conjunction introduces a clause or sentence that records the effect of the action in another clause or sentence.

"consequently" in Matthew 19:5-6

Series of Alternatives

The conjunction connects clauses or sentences, each of which is independent and different.

"or" in Matthew 26:51-53

Series of Facts

The conjunction connects clauses or sentences of the same type. They are not dependent on each other.

"and" in Romans 2:17-19

Temporal

The conjunction introduces a clause or sentence that provides the time when the action happened in another clause or sentence.

"then" in Matthew 2:16


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2001-2003, Ken Bowles - September 30, 2010, Edition

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